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CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17-20

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication


1 Department of Anaesthesiology, Indian Naval Hospital Kalyani, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Indian Naval Hospital Kalyani, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Debashish Paul
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Indian Naval Hospital, Kalyani, Vishakhapatnam - 530 005, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-0311.183579

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Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema. Data suggest that most cases occur in young middle-aged with marked female preponderance, hypertension being the most common cause. In this case, it was diagnosed in a normotensive patient in the postnatal period that underwent cesarean section. The initial symptoms had misled toward a diagnosis of postdural puncture headache. Symptomatic treatment was started immediately in the ICU. This is an interesting case as the patient was a normotensive one without any other contributory factors and there was unanticipated delay in diagnosing the case until the time we could get a magnetic resonance imaging report.


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